Roulette 4 Corners Strategy



The four-number bets pay 8-to-1, but the probability of hitting one of those four numbers is between 10% and 11%. The idea behind the strategy is to bet as little money as possible (ten minimum bets) while covering as much of the table as possible (18 numbers) with better than even money payout odds.

  1. Roulette 4 Corners Strategy Definition
  2. American Roulette Strategy

The four corners rule stipulates that if two parties enter into a written agreement, they cannot use oral or implied agreements to contradict the terms.3 min read

Roulette1. The Four Corners of a Contract

Four Corners is an interactive learning strategy that promotes listening, verbal communication, cooperation, critical thinking, and decision-making. It can be used at any level. Write a controversial statement or problem on the board, or ask a question (could be from a BrainPOP Quiz!), related to the topic of study. You will place five chips on the five same corners and one chip will be placed on any number. Initially, the Five Quads strategy was intended for European or French roulette. In fact, it can also be used in the American variants, but it makes no sense taking into consideration the very unfavorable rules in this type. Gambling history or experience can get right into roulette. Much exactly like this e-book. The strategy behind the e-book is based on the simplicity of the game itself. The e-book will show you systematic, on how to beat the house edge of roulette using a simple as can be strategy. The potential of winning $120 per hour using. For more roulette strategies, look at our main system page, where 13 unique systems are presented for you to study. Compare their requirements, their attributes, their advantages and disadvantages and choose the one that shows you the most promise or just fits your taste better.


Roulette 4 Corners Strategy Definition

2. Times When Outside Evidence Can Be Used
3. Using the Four Corners Rule in Contract Disputes

The four corners rule contract law, also known as the patrol evidence rule, stipulates that if two parties enter into a written agreement, they cannot use oral or implied agreements in court to contradict the terms of the written agreement.

The term 'four corners' refers to the four corners of a document. Basically, it implies that the only legal parts of the contract are within the four corners of a page or online document. If there is evidence that exists outside of these four corners, they cannot be used in court if they directly contradict the terms of the written contract.

Types of evidence not valid in court due to the four corners rule include:

  • Conversations about the signing of the contract
  • Written evidence that is not part of the original written contract
  • Comments from the defendant or plaintiff who are in a breach of contract case

The Four Corners of a Contract

Because of the four corners rule, it is vital to include all promise and expectations you have of the other party in the original written contract. If you fail to do so and rely on spoken promises or guarantees made outside of the contract, enforcing them may prove problematic. Any judge looking at your case will look only at the four corners, not whatever verbal agreements you made.

To protect yourself from this type of situation, it is a great idea to speak with a contract dispute attorney. They can look at the contract and make sure it is fair to both parties before you sign it.

Never trust the other party if they say that you shouldn't worry about a particular clause or statement. While you might be in agreement now, if things go south, you will have no legal support for making that party adhere to your wishes.

There are certain times when outside evidence is useful for supporting a contract, but these are mostly limited to instances of fraud or other problems. If you are in trouble and think this might apply to you, contact a contract dispute attorney for assistance. They can determine whether or not you can use outside evidence in a courtroom to defend your case.

Times When Outside Evidence Can Be Used

There are only a few instances when outside evidence is permissible for supporting a written contract. These might include:

  • To correct a mistake in the original contract.
  • To clear up ambiguous language in the contract and help determine the original meaning.
  • To assist the judge or jury understand the contract better.
  • To clarify a transcription error in the original contract.
  • To prove that the original contract is invalid.
  • To prove that consideration was never offered for the two parties.
  • To show that one party committed fraud, interference, unconscionable behavior, or was under duress when creating the contract.
  • To make changes to the original contract if there is a clause that states oral amendments are permissible.
  • To name the parties involved in cases of changing names.

Using the Four Corners Rule in Contract Disputes

If your contract is in dispute in court, the judge will definitely rely on the four corners rule to keep things as simple as possible. They will use your written documents to discover each party's original intention and decide based off that unless you qualify for one of the exceptions listed above.

The court will only use external evidence as much as it needs to clear up the ambiguity or discover the original intent of the contract.

Generally, the procedure for using the four corners rule is as follows:

  1. The judge will read the written contract and decide if extrinsic evidence is necessary.
  2. The court will enforce the contract as written without extrinsic evidence if not required.
  3. If extrinsic evidence is necessary the judge will use the entirety of the contract in addition to the new evidence to make a ruling that is fair.

Overall, a judge will not try to discover hidden meanings or obscure definitions. Instead, they'll use the ordinary and straightforward meaning of words and clauses to determine how certain statements fit into the agreement as a whole.

If you need help with the four corners rule contract law, you can post your legal need on UpCounsel's marketplace. UpCounsel accepts only the top 5 percent of lawyers to its site. Lawyers on UpCounsel come from law schools such as Harvard Law and Yale Law and average 14 years of legal experience, including work with or on behalf of companies like Google, Menlo Ventures, and Airbnb.

Roulette is one of the most popular table games in modern casinos. Although variations on the game have been around for several hundred years, there are now only 3 variations in American casinos.

You’re likely already familiar with American roulette and European roulette. The most recent addition to the table game inventory is Sands Roulette.

Which of these games should you play?

How should you bet on them?

What’s the smartest strategy for roulette betting?

I’ll explain all that in this post:

What Are the Differences between American, European, and Sands Roulette?

Although these games have a few other differences, the most significant distinction between the 3 versions of roulette are the number of green slots the wheels contain.

Every roulette wheel has at least 37 slots.

36 of those slots are always numbered 1 to 36, and they’re alternately colored RED or BLACK.

The additional slots are green.

In European roulette there is only one green slot, the “0”.

In American roulette there are two green slots: “0” and “00”.

In Sands roulette a third green slot, “S”, has been added to the wheel.

The green slots are there for one reason:

They make the game’s statistical probabilities uneven.

This is because of the way roulette bets are paid off. You can win anywhere from 35-to-1 (for betting on a single number) down to 1-to-1 (for betting on 18 slots at a time).

The payoffs, called “odds”, are not as fair to you as the actual estimated probabilities of the roulette ball landing on any given slot. This is how the casino makes its money.

In a game of roulette the house should keep at least 2.70% of all the bets players make over time. The casino has no need to cheat the players. In fact, the players often make really bad bets that improve the “house edge”, as that casino profit is called.

One of the other differences between European roulette and both American and Sands roulette is that the European roulette table has an additional betting area. This secondary betting area is used to place specially designed bets. They are more complicated than the normal bets made in American and Sands roulette. I’m going to ignore this section of the table, because I’m going to show you how to place bets that have the best chances of paying off.

Is There a Winning System for Roulette?

Everyone who gets into roulette sooner or later starts to think about how they can “beat the system”.

I’m going to be honest here:

There is no way to do that.

The green slots on the wheel make it impossible for anyone, anywhere, to ever design a betting system that is guaranteed to win. If you really want to guarantee yourself a win every time, then put a chip on each of the 2-to-1 outside bets and on each of the green number bets.

That’s the only way you’ll be paid money every time the wheel spins.

You’ll also go broke.

You may have heard about a system called the Martingale System. It’s a popular betting system with new roulette players.

Experienced roulette players just turn their heads and roll their eyes when someone mentions the Martingale System. The only way you can make money with the Martingale System is to write a book about it and get people to buy your book.

Even that’s a gamble, though, because most people now know that the Martingale System promises more than it delivers.

American Roulette Strategy

Roulette corners strategy

Here’s how this system works:

You start out betting the minimum. If you lose, you double your bet. If you win on your doubled bet, you go back to betting the table minimum. If you lose again, you double the size of your bet again.

This sounds great to inexperienced bettors but the problem is that you’ll either run out of money or hit the table limit before you can recoup your losses as they add up.

The Martingale System is a sucker bet, plain and simple.

Every betting system in every form of gambling tries to leverage probability theory. The Martingale System and other roulette betting strategies also rely on probability estimates.

But there’s a flaw in the thinking behind these systems. If you account for the flaw you’ll be okay. You won’t always win but your expectations will be more reasonable.

The secret to not going broke when you gamble is to set reasonable expectations and maintain your self-discipline. You should never drink or take drugs when you gamble. They lower your inhibitions and impair your judgment.

You might as well just hand your money over to the casino at the cashier window and say “keep it” if you’re going to drink or do drugs when you gamble.

How Do Probabilities Work in Roulette?

Probability theory came out of statistics. It tries to give us rules by which to guess what happens next in any situation. The guesses are seldom accurate predictions. Sometimes the guesses work out, and sometimes they don’t. Gamblers love probability theory because they think it helps them pick the best betting strategies.

You’re actually more likely to double your money during a roulette session if you put all your money on a single bet. The more bets you place, the less likely it becomes to double your money.

That’s because every bet brings you close to the long term expectations. The closer you are to the short term, the more likely you are to get better than expected results.

In roulette, the probabilities are simple. The dealer spins the wheel and releases a ball that whirls around the outside of the wheel and finally settles in a slot. With only 37 slots on a European roulette wheel you have a 1-in-37 probability of the ball landing on a specific slot.

This probability never changes.

This probability is calculated on the basis of all the known possibilities.

What probability theory cannot do, however, is predict where the ball will stop.

Nor can it predict whether the ball will land on red, black, or green any number of times over the next 100 spins.

Nonetheless, a lot of gambling guides tell you that you have the best chances of winning if you do this because of such-and-such probabilities. And many of these guides warn you that there is no way to predict the future, but by setting the expectation that the ball will land on red about 47% of the time, these guides are making predictions and promises they cannot keep.

They’ll even back up their claims by talking about how to run computer simulations for 1 million spins of the wheel so that you see how often the ball lands on red, black, or green.

In the real world the Probability Fairy is always on vacation. She’ll never be there to wave her magic wand to make things happen the way experts say they should. The ball could land on red over the next 20 spins. Or it could land on black or green or some random mix of color combinations.

You have no way of knowing how many of the next [X] spins will turn out a certain way. Talking about probabilities in this way is just dishonest.

What you can do is look at the wheel and ask yourself how much it costs to bet on the largest possible set of numbers. The idea here is to get as much coverage as you can without losing money too fast.

But even if you cover every number on the wheel you’ll lose money.

So the only way to win in roulette–and this is completely random, never guaranteed–is to bet on less than all the numbers on the wheel.

You also want to play bets that pay better than even money. You can place a variety of bets, but most of them aren’t worthwhile.

Betting on single numbers is a bad idea. You can place bets on the lines between the numbers (these are called “street bets”) and on lines at the corners of numbers (these are called “corner bets”).

But even though you get pretty good odds (payoff) you’re still covering too few numbers.

How Bets Work in Roulette

Divide the bets into two groups:

  1. Inside bets
  2. Outside bets

Inside bets are based on individual numbers or small groups of numbers. When you see players betting on the lines, corners, and individual numbers on the table they are making inside bets.

Outside bets are based on pre-selected groups of numbers on the wheel. The “2-to-1” bets cover 12 numbers each: 1 to 12, 13 to 24, and 25 to 36. The “1-to-1” or “even money” bets cover 18 numbers each:

  • Odd
  • Even
  • Black
  • Red
  • 1 to 18
  • 19 to 36

The bets more likely to pay are the even money bets.

But unless you can win 5 times out of 9 on even money bets you’ll lose your stake. That’s the problem with roulette. You always have to win at least 1 more time than you lose no matter how you place your bets.

The “2 to 1” bets pay better than the “1 to 1” bets because they cover fewer numbers. You have less of a chance of winning.

Roulette 4 Corners Strategy

There are 6 types of “2 to 1” bets:

  • 3 kinds of dozens bets: (1 to 12, 13 to 24, and 25 to 36)
  • 3 kinds of columns bets: ([1, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28, 31, 34], [2, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, 29, 32, 35], [3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36]).

You can make a bet by betting on any two of the “2 to 1” groups. That means that instead of covering only 18 numbers you’ll be covering 24 numbers.

This type of bet is often called the “double dozen” bet. It’s popular among gamblers who like to hedge their bets. They have a better chance (all other things considered) of scoring a win with a “double dozen” than with one of the standard even money bets. If you’re playing it safe and going for even money odds, you should always play a double dozen bet.

If you want to bet more aggressively, then instead of betting more money on your double dozen, you can cover all 36 of the red and black numbers. Leave the green numbers alone. Yes, they’ll come in every now and then, and you’ll lose money.

But there’s a way to keep your losses low.

How to Bet on Columns or Dozens Aggressively

Take 6 chips and distribute them across EITHER the three dozen bets or the three column bets.

Place 3 chips on 1, 2 chips on the 2nd, and 1 chip on the 3rd. If the ball lands on a green number you’ll lose your entire bet, so always play the table minimum with this aggressive style.

If the ball lands on any number with your single chip bet, you’ll win 2 chips and lose 5–for a net loss of 3 chips (half your bet).

That’s the safest way to bet aggressively on the table.

If the ball lands on any number in your 2 chip bet you’ll win 4 chips and lose 4 for no loss. This keeps you in the game.

If the ball lands on any number in your 3chip bet, you’ll win 6 chips and lose 3 for a net gain of 3 chips. This will offset 1 single chip win.

The way this betting strategy works out, your money can grow substantially and still take some big hits. Where the strategy will fail you is when the ball lands on green or if the ball lands on the single chip bet more often than it lands on the 3 chip bet.

Sorry, but there’s no way to prevent that from happening.

There Is No Guaranteed Way to Win in Roulette

I can’t say this often enough:

You can’t win at roulette in the long run.

I think roulette is a fun game to play. It’s exciting because you don’t know where the ball will land. You take an active role in making your wagers.

And you’ll find there are a lot of different betting systems to experiment with. The only thing that is guaranteed in roulette is that the casino will make a profit. What you hope for is that they make their profit at someone else’s expense.

Players who try to improve their luck by making big bets do sometimes win, but most often the people who come out ahead are the patient players who use conservative betting strategies and take money off the table. If you only walk away with your beginning stake you’ll be luckier than most gamblers.

And you can take that to the bank.